Emerging queer Aboriginal artist Sheree Stewart rips open her entire universe in her world premiere, one woman show and asks you to be brave enough to witness. Pilepileta (Wemba Wemba language meaning ‘to shine, glitter’) is the unapologetic and raw accounts of what it was like to grow up as a queer Aboriginal woman in a small town built on racism and homophobia. It is poignant, powerful and needs to be heard – “It’s time you give us silenced ones a chance to finally speak up…”

Sheree has woven together an unforgettable tapestry of spoken word, dance, movement and videography as she breaks the silence and explores the often ‘push it under the rug’ themes of domestic violence, alcoholism and death. Even through exploring these almost unbearable topics, Sherees story is laced with beauty… Sheree says “the story isn’t all heavy. Hard at times, definitely. But it is imbued with magic and connection. It’s a story of the human condition and how each of us walk it with both fragility and resilience.”

Sheree herself is complex and multifaceted human. Her first appearance at Melbourne Fringe Festival was in 2017, where she joined the avante guarde cast of ‘Erotic Bedtime Stories for Adults’, boldly and proudly decolonising fetish as part of her Acknowledgement of Country. She has been the feature artist at Melbourne’s spoken word arena ‘Mother Tongue’ created by Fleassey Malay. Earlier this year she was presented a NAIDOC award ‘Honouring the Women of the West’ for the midwifery work she does supporting her Aboriginal families.

With 60,000 years of ancestry behind her, her Nan’s advice and a Dreamtime creator eagle by her side, Sheree believes that anything is possible and she brings this to her show.

“I made this show because I want everyone to feel like they can share their story too, no matter how much you think it doesn’t matter. It does matter. You matter. You all have a story and telling your story is like medicine. When we finally talk and are heard, it can heal us”